Savoury Yogurt Bowl with Chickpeas and Roasted Vegetables

Round, shallow white bowl with a layer of Greek yogurt on the bottom, chickpeas, and roasted peppers, zucchini, and shallots. The dish is sitting on top of a brightly coloured batik tablecloth.

I love full fat plain Greek yogurt. I love it in salad dressings. I love it as a base for homemade frozen yogurt. I love it as a dip. I love it in breakfast parfaits. But you know what I’m especially loving lately? A savoury yogurt bowl.

Making the perfect savoury yogurt bowl: Everything you need to know

  • The sky’s the limit when it comes to toppings so you can feel free to flex your improvisational skills: Shredded chicken or pork, crispy diced tofu, sautéed greens, roasted vegetables, julienned fresh vegetables, chopped nuts, toasted seeds, nut butter, antipasto, refried beans, crumbled or grated cheese, tahini, pulses, hot sauce, tapenade, and any other topping you can dream of will work well on top of a savoury yogurt bowl.
  • Savoury yogurt bowls are incredibly easy to meal prep for several day’s worth of lunches or dinners. Keep each element separate and mix just before eating. You can also make the chickpea salad and roasted vegetables with Ras El Hanout in advance and store them in the fridge for a meal that comes together in less than five minutes.
  • Greek yogurt is a fantastic source of protein, making it ideal if you don’t eat poultry, meat, or fish.
  • Unlike a grain bowl, there’s no prep necessary (other than the toppings). Just grab a container of plain full fat Greek yogurt and you’re halfway to a satisfying meal.
  • Turn a savoury yogurt bowl into a simple yet elegant dinner by pairing it with a crisp green salad and fresh fruit.
Clear glass divided lunch container with three sections. One contains fresh blackberries, one contains roasted zucchini, red pepper, and shallots, and one contains chickpeas with a dollop of yogurt. The container is sitting on a colourful batik print table cloth.

What is Ras El Hanout?

Ras El Hanout is a North African spice blend containing (amongst other spices) cinnamon, cumin, ginger, peppercorn, rose petals, coriander, paprika, and dried chilies. A few years ago a friend brought some back for me from Morocco and I’ve been a fan ever since. Can’t find it at your local grocery store? Check your local specialty cooking or spice shop or buy it online. Because of the spice blend’s earthiness, warmth, and gently astringency, I love to use Ras El Hanout on roasted chicken, as a rub for white fish, in citrus-based salad dressings, and sprinkled on popcorn with melted butter.

Round, shallow white bowl with a layer of Greek yogurt on the bottom, chickpeas, and roasted peppers, zucchini, and shallots. The dish is sitting on top of a brightly coloured batik tablecloth.

Savoury Yogurt Bowl With Chickpeas And Roasted Vegetables

Yields:

3-4 generously sized savoury yogurt bowls

Ingredients:

Full fat Greek yogurt

Chickpea salad with lemon parsley dressing (see recipe below)

Roasted vegetables with Ras El Hanout (see recipe below)

Black sesame seeds

Nigella seeds

Dried red chilies

Special equipment:

3-4 shallow bowls

Method:

Add two to three dollops of Greek yogurt to each bowl. Top with the chickpea salad and then the roasted vegetables with Ras el Hanout. Liberally sprinkle with black sesame seeds, nigella seeds, and dried red chilies.

Clear glass divided lunch container with three sections. One contains fresh blackberries, one contains roasted zucchini, red pepper, and shallots, and one contains chickpeas with a dollop of yogurt. The container is sitting on a colourful batik print table cloth.

Simple Chickpea Salad With Lemon Parsley Dressing

Yields:

Enough for 3-4 generous savoury yogurt bowls

Ingredients:

1/2 cup fresh parley

2-3 cloves of garlic, smashed and peeled

1 tsp. Dijon mustard

Juice of half a lemon (or, a generous tablespoon of bottled lemon juice)

2 Tbsp. olive oil

1/4 tsp. kosher salt

1 can of chickpeas, drained and rinsed

Special equipment:

Can opener

Medium-sized salad bowl

Measuring spoons

Food processor, blender, or mini-chopper

Spatula

Method:

  1. Add all of the ingredients except for the chickpeas to a food processor, blender, or mini-chopper and blitz until smooth. Taste for seasonings and readjust if needed.
  2. Toss the chickpeas with the salad dressing in a medium-sized bowl.
  3. Set the chickpeas aside until you’re ready to assemble the savoury yogurt bowls. This salad can be stored in the fridge for up to three days, keeping in mind the pungency of the garlic will increase substantially.
Clear glass divided lunch container with three sections. One contains fresh blackberries, one contains roasted zucchini, red pepper, and shallots, and one contains chickpeas with a dollop of yogurt. The container is sitting on a colourful batik print table cloth.

Roasted Vegetables With Ras El Hanout

Yields:

Enough for 3-4 generous savoury yogurt bowls

Ingredients:

1 medium-sized zucchini, cut in half lengthwise and then into fairly thick half moons

1 red pepper, cut into chunky strips

4-5 shallots (depending on size), peeled and cut into quarters lengthwise

1-2 Tbsp. olive oil

1 Tbsp. Ras El Hanout

1/2 tsp. kosher salt

Special equipment:

Sharp knife

Cutting board

Large rimmed baking sheet

Measuring spoons

Parchment paper or silicon baking mat

Long-handled tongs

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375° Fahrenheit.
  2. Spread the vegetables in a single layer over a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or silicon baking mat.
  3. Drizzle the vegetables with olive oil and evenly distribute the Ras El Hanout and kosher salt, massaging the oil and spice mixture into the sliced vegetables.
  4. Roast the vegetables for 30 minutes, using long-handled kitchen tongs to stir everything three or four times throughout.
  5. Once the vegetables are lightly browned and soft they’re finished. Set them aside until you’re ready to make the savoury yogurt bowls or keep them covered, in the fridge, for up to four days.
Round, shallow white bowl with a layer of Greek yogurt on the bottom, chickpeas, and roasted peppers, zucchini, and shallots. The dish is sitting on top of a brightly coloured batik tablecloth.

What I’m listening to

Jazz from a strange celestial place. Hypnotic jazz. Give me some really good vibes jazz. Jazz for drinking a glass of wine and chopping up shallots. The kind of jazz that could score a montage of people coming home on Friday evening after work. As the late, stupendously great Carol Channing sang, “Cause I’m a jazz baby, little jazz baby that’s me.”

Alice Coltrane – Something About John Coltrane

Zucchini, Caper, and Parmesan Naan Pizza

A naan pizza on parchment paper covered in thinly sliced zucchini, capers, parmesan cheese, and parsley.

I always keep a bag of naan in my freezer for those times where I’m cooking for one and I want a personal pizza or flatbread in under 20 minutes. I don’t have to worry about the annoying process of stretching out pizza dough (I know, I know, it’s supposed to be fun but I have very little patience with anything dough-related) and naan is the perfect size for a pizza meant for one person. This zucchini version comes together quickly, especially if you have a mandolin for the slicing, and the tanginess of the capers, the nuttiness of the parmesan, and the garlicky olive oil blend together effortlessly to form a naan pizza with big flavour and a very short list of ingredients.

zucchini, caper, and parmesan naan pizza:

Naan bread

2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

2-3 cloves of garlic, finely minced

A small handful of parsley, chopped into tiny pieces

Kosher salt and freshly cracked pepper

Very thinly sliced zucchini, enough to cover the naan with some overlap

1 tsp. pickled capers, chopped

Parmigiano-Reggiano or other very firm and flavourful cheese, finely grated

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a small bowl combine the olive oil, garlic, parsley, and a a generous pinch of kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper.
  3. Using a pastry brush, coat the naan with a generous amount of the oil and garlic mixture making sure to leave some for the brushing on top of the zucchini.
  4. Place the oil-brushed naan on a parchment-lined baking tray and warm in the oven for about 5-6 minutes or until the naan is just starting to crisp up. Remove from oven.
  5. Layer the zucchini slices on the naan with a slight overlap and brush with the remaining garlic and parsley oil. Scatter the chopped capers over the zucchini and top with a fine layer of parmesan.
  6. Broil the zucchini naan pizza for a couple of minutes, making sure the edges don’t brown too much and the cheese begins to melt. Slice into three pieces with a pizza cutter and enjoy while hot or at room temperature.

Close-up photo of olive oil with parsley and garlic.

When my sister told me about this album I didn’t believe it existed, which is ridiculous in retrospect because why wouldn’t this be a real thing? This is the first remix on the album and in my opinion it’s the best one. I mean, I already listen to Enya without shame on my own but the combination of Enya as well as Dntel results in an ethereal layering of voices and warmth that makes for a beautiful listening experience.

Dntel – After Ventus (Enya Mixes)

Pasta with Bacon, Zucchini, and Creme Fraiche

Bacon and Zucchini Pasta

There are some nights when nothing will calm the stresses of your day except fat and carbs, nothing but a warm bowl of pasta covered in the comforting flavours of bacon, creme fraiche, and softly cooked zucchini. When I get home from work and it’s cold and raining I feel an instant need to have a hot shower and get into soft pyjamas. Once these immediate goals are accomplished I put on some music and return to the most pressing need of all, the need to cook with simple and filling ingredients in order to create a sensation of quiet domestic happiness (and this is a sensation I strongly crave after days filled with extroverted chatter.) Creme fraiche, a sort of high fat version of sour cream, is an easy addition creamy sauces as it gives a heavenly and rich mouthfeel but doesn’t carry the risk of separating when heated (unlike yogurt or lower fat sour creams.) You could substitute thinly sliced white button mushrooms for the zucchini and add fresh thyme and basil along with lemon zest and a quick squeeze of lemon juice. If you prefer an aged pecorino in place of the the Reggiano I humbly suggest a good sharp chunk of black peppercorn studded pecorino pepato.

bacon and zucchini pasta with creme fraiche:

3 strips of bacon, cut into small pieces (can be snipped with scissors)

2 tsp. olive oil

1 small zucchini, sliced into thin half moons

1 small red onion, sliced into thin half moons

1 clove of garlic, minced

1/2 cup of dry white wine or dry vermouth

1/2 cup of chicken stock

1/2 cup of creme fraiche

1/2 tsp. red chilli flakes

1/2 tsp. dried oregano

Juice of half a lemon

Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper to taste

Fresh parsley

200 g of dried pasta of your choice

100 g of Parmigiano-Reggiano, finely shredded (plus more for the table)

1. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to boil and cook pasta according to package directions. Before draining the pasta reserve 1/2 a cup of the pasta water to help thicken the sauce.

2. While the water is heating up cook the bacon over medium-high heat until crispy in a large skillet. Drain the bacon on paper towel and remove the excess bacon fat from the pan.

3. Add the olive oil to the pan and sauté the zucchini, onion, and garlic over medium-high heat until soft. Reduce heat to medium and stir in the chicken stock, white wine or vermouth, creme fraiche, bacon, chili, oregano, salt, a handful of Parmesan leaves, and kosher salt; allow to simmer for 2-3 minutes before stirring in the cooked pasta. Toss to coat and then toss again with the shredded Parmesan cheese. Serve in warmed bowls with extra child flakes, Reggiano, and fresh parsley.

My mom listened to a lot of Suzanne Vega when I was growing up. A lot of it I can remember as the soundtrack for when we would go on road trips to the beach at Grand Bend or Toronto. I would look at the liner notes over and over again in the passenger side of the car, watching the Ontario countryside flash by us as we drove down the highway. Or curled up in the backseat under a beach blanket, skin smelling like sunscreen and campfire, looking at the roaming lights created by lone car head lights in the wide open darkness of rural routes and apple orchards. Suzanne Vega was the first version of a cool person that I can think of really wanting to emulate (one day anyway, at the time I was only 10 years old.) I still want to be like her and I still love her music, I can listen to the album 99.9 F° over and over again without ever tiring of its initial pull; there’s something comforting about music and art that continues to protect as you (and it) gets older.

Suzanne Vega – Rock in This Pocket (Song of David)