Honey-Roasted Tomato Spread

A glass jar containing savoury roasted tomato spread with a spoonful of roasted tomato spread in the background. The dishes rest on a white tablecloth.

Let’s face it, unless you live in a warm climate year-round winter tomatoes will always be things of underwhelming mediocrity. So what’s the antidote to several months of off-season tomatoes? You take a tried-and-true cooking method like slow-roasting and you add a generous drizzle of honey (and sundried tomatoes just to be sure). Blitzing the slow-roasted honey-coated tomatoes with a few other familiar savoury ingredients results in a spread so full of deep tomato flavour it may as well have been made with tomatoes cut fresh from the vine.

What to do with honey-roasted tomato spread

  • Make a sophisticated yet simple pasta dish: Prepare your favourite pasta noodles as directed, reserving a scant cup of salted pasta water before draining. Add the honey-roasted tomato spread to the hot pasta, using about 2 tablespoons of the spread per serving and thinning it with the pasta water. Top with more chopped olives, fresh oregano or basil, and plenty of good parmesan.
  • Add to grilled cheese: Spread a thick layer of honey-roasted tomato spread onto one half of a grilled cheese as it’s being prepped. Fresh cow or buffalo milk mozzarella, Chèvre Noir (or other aged goat cheddar), and Taleggio are all excellent pairings.
  • Use as a cheese or charcuterie accoutrement: Honey-roasted tomato spread can be used as-is or piled onto a thick layer of labneh or Greek yogurt.
  • In egg dishes: Either use as a topping for eggs or incorporate it directly into omelettes, quiches, and frittatas.
  • With roasted chicken and pork: A spoonful of honey-roasted tomato spread will do wonders to liven up roasted chicken and pork. Alternately, rub the spread directly onto the poultry or meat to infuse it with delicious Mediterranean flavours.
Two spoons resting on a decorative plate. One contains honey-roasted tomato spread the other capers.

Honey-Roasted Tomato Spread

Yields:

1 generous cup of honey-roasted tomato spread

Ingredients:

2 pints cherry or grape tomatoes (or any other small, sweet tomatoes)

8 cloves of garlic, papery skins removed and left whole

1 large sprig of fresh rosemary

2 sprigs of fresh thyme

2 sprigs of fresh oregano

2 Tbsp. olive oil + 2 Tbsp. olive oil, divided

2 Tbsp. honey

Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste

Juice of 1/2 a lemon

8-10 kalamata olives, pits removed

1 tsp. capers, in brine or salted and rinsed

2 Tbsp. sundried tomatoes in oil, drained and roughly chopped

Special equipment:

Sharp chef’s knife

Cutting board

Measuring cups and spoons

Roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet

Parchment paper or silicon baking mat

Kitchen tongs

Food processor

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 275° Fahrenheit/135° Celsius.
  2. Line a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicon baking mat.
  3. Spread the tomatoes, garlic cloves, rosemary, thyme, and oregano evenly across the roasting pan or baking sheet.
  4. Drizzle the tomatoes, garlic, and fresh herbs with 2 tablespoons of olive oil, the honey, and a generous sprinkling of kosher salt and freshly cracked pepper. Use your hands to toss everything together, making sure the oil and honey are evenly distributed.
  5. Roast the tomatoes for 60-90 minutes, gently stirring the contents of the baking sheet with a spatula.
  6. The tomatoes are done once they’ve collapsed and have developed a jammy texture.
  7. Remove the remaining sprigs of fresh herbs and scrape the tomatoes and garlic cloves into a food processor (make sure you get any pan juices, too!).
  8. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive, lemon juice, kalamata olives, capers, and sundried tomatoes. Blitz until the mixture is thoroughly combined, scraping down the sides with a spatula.
  9. Transfer the honey-roasted tomato spread to a sealed container or glass jar and store for up to 2 weeks.

I am a monster, but I am also in love with Austra (they’re no stranger to Music With Dinner). Despite feeling like I’ve taken a swan dive into a drowning pool, I can almost feel the truth of “I don’t feel nothing, anymore.” Everything about this song is my current truth as I’m experiencing it. The energy of this song is frenetic and uncomfortable, the vocals are questioning, searching, resigning. In what feels like several weeks of oscillation between overwhelming sadness and total loss of feeling, the euphonic depth of Austra’s Future Politics is the perfect, darkest cloak to hide behind.

Austra – I’m A Monster

Spicy Pickled Watermelon Radish

Thinly sliced watermelon radish on a white background with parsley.

This recipe for pickled watermelon radish follows a very basic method for making refrigerator pickles and can easily be used to pickle any other crunchy vegetable. Watermelon radishes are so delightfully twee in appearance and the pickling process renders them a delicate shade of rose, making them look absolutely gorgeous laid out on a cheese or charcuterie board. These pickles need to sit for at least 48 hours before they’re ready to eat and can potentially stay in your fridge for a whole month, although it’s doubtful they’ll hang around that long.

spicy pickled watermelon radish:

2-3 watermelon radishes, sliced as thinly as possible into rounds

2 tsp. mustard seeds

1-2 dried whole chiles

1 1/2 tsp. coriander seeds

1 Tbsp. kosher salt

1/2 cup of white wine vinegar

1/2 cup of unseasoned rice vinegar

1 cup of water

1/3 cup of white granulated sugar

  1. Prepare 1 medium-sized canning jar by washing it in very hot, soapy water and allowing to hand-dry or running it through the dishwasher.
  2. Add the mustard and coriander seeds and dried chile pepper to the jar.
  3. Bring the vinegars, water, sugar, and salt to a simmer in a small saucepan and stir until the sugar is completely dissolved (how’s that for accidental alliteration?).
  4. Pour the hot brine over the sliced watermelon radish leaving a couple of centimetre’s space at the top, carefully applying the lid and smoothing out any air bubbles so that a tight seal is formed.
  5. Store the pickled watermelon radish in the fridge and let them sit for at least 48 hours and up to a month.

It’s another bright and sunny day in Vancouver and frankly speaking, I feel like I’m standing on the edge of a precipice looking down into 6 months of rain and scatterings of damp snow. I’m hanging on by listening to the sunniest music I can get my hands on (and, I’ll admit, maybe secretly playing my autumn favourites ahead of time). If you feel like upping the dreaminess of making homemade pickles out of watermelon radishes then I’d highly suggest creating kitchen ambience with this sunny little album. It’s an effortless listen, pairing well in the mornings with a cup of tea or with a cold Ting and whatever-you-fancy cocktail later in the day.

Vince Guaraldi & Bola Sete – Y Sus Amigos (full album)